Monthly Archives: October 2006

Stonefly Fly Tying Class by Gunpowder River Guides

Join us Saturday, January 13 for a Stonefly fly tying class that focuses on Gunpowder river patterns. Jason du Pont will be teaching this fun-filled life-cycle class for intermediate tyers.Cost of the class is $45 per person, and includes the use of materials, please bring your own tools.The class is limited to six and pre-registration is required. Please give us a call at 410-329-6821 or drop us a line at info@backwaterangler.com to pre-register.

Low water in the Gunpowder river for awhile…

We’ll be experiencing some low water for awhile. Water flow is at a low, low 24Cfs so bring your Summer rod-a 7′ 7″ 3wt 4pc Scott G2 would be nice. Small water calls for small flies so fish tiny olives, caddis and brassies and be sure to bring along some 7x. Expect to see some ankle deep water out there folks-think lower river and have fun out there…

Thanks to Ellen for the following report…

You’re the greatest! We stopped by the shop at 2 pm on Saturday October 21st and took your recommendations on huge caddis flies.

Went to Mazemore and walked upstream from the bridge, fishing close to the banks. The weather was beautiful; no rises, but we tried the dries anyway. Second cast: a nice 11″ rainbow. All in all, 9 or 10 fish depending on how you count.

To explain: I fished into a small eddy and caught a very small fish (by its weak wriggling); as I was bringing it in, suddenly the line went down and a very different, very strong action began. At first I though the fish was playing with me, but as I brought whatever was on the line to my net (carefully since I was using light tackle and a 2 st rod), I realized that a very large brown trout (>15″) had taken on my little catch. Just as I reached to net them both, Big Boy decided on a wiser course on action and let go, leaving a four inch quite dead young ‘un on my fly. I was able to pass on your recommendations to a young angler, and as soon as he put large caddis flies on, he reported on several hits.

Simms Guard Sock Review

Simms Guard sock is perfect for those July and August days when temperatures rise to unbearable heights. Combine the sock with a wading shoe or a pair Simms Keen River Sandal to keep feet warm in the cold flows of the Gunpowder or Savage river. Going waderless in these hot conditions can allow anglers a chance to hike into areas where other anglers wearing waders woudn’t dare.

Jason du Pont

Scott E2 Rod Review

Scott’s E2 rod series could change the way you fish. Let me explain. They offer a variety of weights and lengths for each type of fishing. I chose the 10 foot 4 weight rod for the Gunpowder, Savage and North Branch, because higher flows will keep you from wading into the river as far as you like. This rod allows the same ability to control drift with dries or a pair of nymphs under an indicator. It takes high sticking to a whole new level and it mends and picks up forty feet of line for roll casts with ease. It can put the fly into those seams on the far bank, that the 8’6″ and 9 footers can’t reach. It has a soft tip to protect light tippet, but looks more like a six weight at the butt. The Scott E2 1004-4 is a hooksetting, nymphing, line throwing machine. For smaller waters the Scott E2 9003-4 is an excellent rod with similar characteristics.

Jason du Pont

Winston LT 5 Piece Trout Rod Review

The LT rod excells at throwing line with ease, but also is soft enough to protect the lighter tippets often required for east coast trout. My favorite is the 8 foot 9 inch 3 weight LT. It is a great dry fly rod, and is a perfect Gunpowder rod. The length is perfect for nymphing pockets or riffles, and the butt section is strong enough to throw a big bugger down and across river. The tip section is soft for protecting tippets, but helps direct small caddis or adams under branches with accuracy. The softer action gives the eight inchers a much bigger feel. If you’re tired of a stiff rod, the LT rods are for you.

Jason du Pont

Scott E2 1004-4 Fly Rod Review

Scott’s E2 rod series could change the way you fish. Let me explain. They offer a variety of weights and lengths for each type of fishing. I chose the 10 foot 4 weight rod for the Gunpowder, Savage and North Branch, because higher flows will keep you from wading into the river as far as you like. This rod allows the same ability to control drift with dries or a pair of nymphs under an indicator. It takes high sticking to a whole new level and it mends and picks up forty feet of line for roll casts with ease. It can put the fly into those seams on the far bank, that the 8’6″ and 9 footers can’t reach. It has a soft tip to protect light tippet, but looks more like a six weight at the butt. The Scott E2 1004-4 is a hooksetting, nymphing, line throwing machine. For smaller waters the Scott E2 9003-4 is an excellent rod with similar characteristics.
Rating: 5 of 5 Stars! [5 of 5 Stars!]
Reviewer: Jason du Pont is a staff member, guide, writer and videographer.
Buy a Scott E2 1004-4 fly rod at Backwaterangler.com

Cloudveil Flat Creek Jacket Review

Cloudveil has created a jacket that could change winter and fall fishing for many anglers–no more bulky layers of thermals on cold winter days. The Flat Creek Jacket is thinner than expected for cold weather gear, but the Windstopper Fleece and added insulation keeps the cold out. The front zips can be opened for increased breathability while moving or whenever temperatures rise. The jacket can be worn on colder September mornings at first light or under a rain shell during a November winter sleeting. The three oversized front pockets can all be accessed even in chest high waders, and the colors allow anglers to disappear riverside.

Jason du Pont

Fishpond San Juan Vertical Chest Pack Review

The San Juan vertical chest pack can do it all. Many anglers burden themselves with an overloaded vest or backpack. I’ve been guiding out of one of these little packs for two years and won’t change anytime soon. Inside it holds two C&F leaf boxes, one large Morrell, and two small myrans, leaders, licenses, etc. On the outside, nylon loops and elastic cuffs secure tippet spools, nippers, dry shake, Gink and weighted putty. It can be worn in a number of ways, but in summer when flows are lower and days hotter, I wear it as a fanny pack. In higher flows it can be worn over the shoulder to keep it dry and close but out of the way.

Jason du Pont

Simms Dry Creek Camera Bag Review

The Simms Dry Creek Camera bag is the perfect answer for the angler who likes to pack light, but carry essentials. I rarely fish without a camera on my shoulder, but often find myself waist deep in the Gunpowder, Savage or North Branch of the Potomac River. This bag can allow anglers a chance to bring a camera, that they may otherwise worry about getting wet. It also holds a Patagonia Deep Wading Jacket quite nicely. Straps secure the bag onto a wading belt to keep it out of the way. Extra fly boxes, water, or even lunch can now be brought without a vest or jacket.

Jason du Pont